Introducing Shamim’s Pantry Pasture Grazed Ghee

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Hi my dear friends and fellow bloggers!

Again… it has been a tad bit too long since I wrote to you last.  As I mentioned in my previous post I was working on “Project Ghee”, well I don’t think I called it that exactly … but it sure does sound good right now 🙂

Anyway, let me tell you what I’ve been up too.  I’ve been preoccupied with ‘GHEE’, now I’m sure you shaking your head and thinking, “Really Shamim, like you had to tell us that!” (sarcasm intended)  Well, of course it’s ghee.  Ghee all the way baby!

Since the beginning of this year, Continue reading

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African Banana Puri – Banana Dumpling

I could so do with a Banana Puri right now. Been working really hard on a new project and wishing I had a couple of these to keep me going.
A little blast from the past. Although, I would use grapeseed oil for frying now. Enjoy!

For The Love Of Ghee

My Grandmother’s Recipe

If you’re craving something not too sweet and delicious with your coffee or tea (chaa), this is the recipe for you.  I won’t beat around the bush, but I struggled a little thinking of the best way to describe this to you.  The puri is not, by all means, meant to be soft and fluffy like a beignet or doughnut.  It is rather solid, moist and crunchy all at once.  I ate these puris countless of times during my childhood.  If I had to put a finger on it, I would say the banana puri  to me is the equivalent of a doughnut to some, that is if we were talking about childhood nostalgic foods.

If you’re lucky enough, when you’re frying the puri’s they puff up into these balloon like disks, creating a hollow center.  I love peeling away this layer and eating it…

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Dhokri or Dhokla – Steamed Savoury Cake

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Dhokri is my comfort food… I ate a lot of it whilst growing up and could count on there being a plateful of dhokri at any given event.  Apart from being a delicious mouthful Dhokri does make for the perfect finger food.  The lemony yellow snack would shine away as if peeking out from behind a cloud – heavy with rain. The tangy sponginess accompanied by the snappy crunch of the sesame seeds, laced with the herby aroma of the cilantro will have you salivating unapologetically.

Dhokri is a slightly spicy and tangy savory snack mostly made in Gujarati homes.  It has the texture of a light sponge cake.  The bulk of the recipe is made with chickpea flour and the dough is tied with either buttermilk or yogurt, along with several spices and left to ferment overnight.  It’s then steamed in trays, cooled, cut and garnished with fresh cilantro, sesame and black mustard seeds.  It does seem kind of daunting at first, but believe me once you get the hang of it, it’s ‘putsy peasy’. Continue reading

Mango Pickle – Keri jo Aathnu

Mango Pickle

Methi (fenugreek) Mango Pickle

Summer, Oh wonderful Summer!! We wait endlessly for summer to roll on by and when it does… It seems we get busy pickling, jamming, bottling and stuffing summer into containers to savor in the winter months that lay ahead.

This weekend I picked up a bag full of green mangos, available at this time of the year. If you’ve never had one, maybe this summer will be a first. Green mangos are quite unlike their yellow counterparts. They are quite tart and crunchy to munch on. Basically, they are the raw version of the voluptuous yellow orbs that frequent most grocery stores.

My mum, the best damn cook I know, would cut the unpeeled green mangos into long slivers. Sprinkle them with cayenne pepper and salt, and serve it as a condiment with our main meal of the day. My sister and me, would later make mango pickle sandwiches and eat it as a snack. The pillowy softness of the thick slices of bread slathered with butter and layered with the mangos were absolute perfection… I’m drooling right now! Continue reading

Homemade Rose Syrup

 

Homemade Rose Syrup

As a child, my grandmother made this syrup with fresh roses from her garden, when roses actually smelled of roses. She simmered the freshly washed petals with the sugar syrup. The roses  infused the syrup with their soft scent and tinted the syrup a bright ruby red.

A favorite treat she made in the summer was homemade popsicles. She crushed the ice and molded it into balls on a stick and poured the sticky ruby red liquid all over it. It was such fun, sitting in her garden amongst her flower pots, indulging on what was once growing on the shrub next to us.

Well with summer around the corner, it’s time to bust out the ideal recipe for a cool refreshing drink.  My take on the perfect drink is a homemade rose syrup that’s been infused with cardamom pods, complimented with a hint of licorice flavor, from the fennel seeds and a bit of a zing from the ginger. I seldom use organic red roses to add to the syrup as they cost ‘an arm and a leg’ but if you have access to them, a handful of red petals should do.  In my recipe I’ve used a good quality rose essence to infuse this syrup instead.

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