Introducing Shamim’s Pantry Pasture Grazed Ghee

Shamim_logo_comp_Mast

Hi my dear friends and fellow bloggers!

Again… it has been a tad bit too long since I wrote to you last.  As I mentioned in my previous post I was working on “Project Ghee”, well I don’t think I called it that exactly … but it sure does sound good right now 🙂

Anyway, let me tell you what I’ve been up too.  I’ve been preoccupied with ‘GHEE’, now I’m sure you shaking your head and thinking, “Really Shamim, like you had to tell us that!” (sarcasm intended)  Well, of course it’s ghee.  Ghee all the way baby!

Since the beginning of this year, Continue reading

Dhokri or Dhokla – Steamed Savoury Cake

IMG_8850

Dhokri is my comfort food… I ate a lot of it whilst growing up and could count on there being a plateful of dhokri at any given event.  Apart from being a delicious mouthful Dhokri does make for the perfect finger food.  The lemony yellow snack would shine away as if peeking out from behind a cloud – heavy with rain. The tangy sponginess accompanied by the snappy crunch of the sesame seeds, laced with the herby aroma of the cilantro will have you salivating unapologetically.

Dhokri is a slightly spicy and tangy savory snack mostly made in Gujarati homes.  It has the texture of a light sponge cake.  The bulk of the recipe is made with chickpea flour and the dough is tied with either buttermilk or yogurt, along with several spices and left to ferment overnight.  It’s then steamed in trays, cooled, cut and garnished with fresh cilantro, sesame and black mustard seeds.  It does seem kind of daunting at first, but believe me once you get the hang of it, it’s ‘putsy peasy’. Continue reading

Dhaar with Vegetables – (Lentil and Vegetable Curry)

My Mums Recipe

As a child and well into the years after I got married, I absorbed as much as I could from my maternal grandmother regarding her cooking and recipes.  I  would gaze at her for hours, mesmerized by the effortless way she made ingredients come together.  She would make barfee – a sweet Indian confection similar to fudge, with a balanced sweetness complimented by the creaminess of the ghee – that held it together.  It was never overly sweet.  Her rotis were the best I’ve had and, as a matter of fact, many folk lucky enough to be in her realm would vouch for that too.  A hot ghee smeared roti, perfectly toasted on top to reveal a crispy layer against the pillowy softness of the bottom layer, begged to be eaten with her homemade mango jam.

 

IMG_0409

Dhaar with String Beans and Potatoes

Continue reading

Moongh Daar – Mung Dhal Curry (Split Green Lentils Curry)

My Recipe

IMG_7692

Moongh Dhar Curry is absolutely delicious eaten as a main course, especially on a blustery cold winter day.  Therefore, recently I have been making it pretty often .  This lentil curry can be eaten with rice or with warm rotis accompanied by a green chilli pickle called Raito.  This will probably the fastest curry you will ever make, perfect for a weeknight!  As long as you’ve made your rotis for the week you are set, I promise.  Out of roti’s for the week?   No problem, spread whole wheat toast (or toast of your choice) with ghee or butter, preferably ghee, then pile on the Moongh Daar and devour!  It’s purely addictive.  Try it out and taste it for yourself, you will not be disappointed 🙂

Continue reading

For the Love of Ghee!

Ghee is the true essence of the food I grew up eating as a child.


Being of Indian heritage and growing up in Zimbabwe, I am proud to say I have stayed well connected to our indian culture, tradition and most importantly the food.

  • a bowl of fluffy rice dowsed in ghee and a spoonful of sugar.  Pure heaven!
  • a square of perfectly made barfi, an indian sweet confectionary made with milk.
  • a delicate biryani doused in ghee.  Taking days to make with the utmost attention to detail and made with the finest ingredients.
  • hadur waro keer – a warm milky concoction, an antidote to a cold and cough, made with ghee and turmeric, sweetened with jaggery.  Perfect on a cold wintery day before bed time.


However, I’d absolutely devour a good steak and kidney pie in a heart beat.  That’s the great thing about growing up in Zimbabwe, I ate as much homebound indian food, as well as, tonnes of food influenced along the way by british cookery.

  •   Hot, yummy and crispy fish and chips made to perfection.
  •   A moist sausage roll made with the flakiest pastry
  •  and let’s not forget Shepherds pie, just to name a few.


As an Indian who grew up in Africa, I have a unique twist on classic Indian recipes.  As well a bounty of European and now American recipes to share.  Please join me in my epic adventure in jotting down these glorious finds.

Enjoy, comment, and let’s make ghee!!

All recipes and photos on this blog are the copyright of fortheloveofghee.  
Thanks