Introducing Shamim’s Pantry Pasture Grazed Ghee

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Hi my dear friends and fellow bloggers!

Again… it has been a tad bit too long since I wrote to you last.  As I mentioned in my previous post I was working on “Project Ghee”, well I don’t think I called it that exactly … but it sure does sound good right now 🙂

Anyway, let me tell you what I’ve been up too.  I’ve been preoccupied with ‘GHEE’, now I’m sure you shaking your head and thinking, “Really Shamim, like you had to tell us that!” (sarcasm intended)  Well, of course it’s ghee.  Ghee all the way baby!

Since the beginning of this year, Continue reading

“What Is Ghee?”

 

Ghee in its solid state

Ghee in its solid state

“What is Ghee?” and “Is it bad for you?” Two questions I’m asked, over and over and over again.

I love talking about ghee and it makes me happy.  So…

“FOR THE LOVE OF GHEE!”

I’m finally able to share with you what I know about it.  Without further adieu, I introduce to you, my GHEE FACTS page.

 

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Mango Pickle – Keri jo Aathnu

Mango Pickle

Methi (fenugreek) Mango Pickle

Summer, Oh wonderful Summer!! We wait endlessly for summer to roll on by and when it does… It seems we get busy pickling, jamming, bottling and stuffing summer into containers to savor in the winter months that lay ahead.

This weekend I picked up a bag full of green mangos, available at this time of the year. If you’ve never had one, maybe this summer will be a first. Green mangos are quite unlike their yellow counterparts. They are quite tart and crunchy to munch on. Basically, they are the raw version of the voluptuous yellow orbs that frequent most grocery stores.

My mum, the best damn cook I know, would cut the unpeeled green mangos into long slivers. Sprinkle them with cayenne pepper and salt, and serve it as a condiment with our main meal of the day. My sister and me, would later make mango pickle sandwiches and eat it as a snack. The pillowy softness of the thick slices of bread slathered with butter and layered with the mangos were absolute perfection… I’m drooling right now! Continue reading

Homemade Rose Syrup

 

Homemade Rose Syrup

As a child, my grandmother made this syrup with fresh roses from her garden, when roses actually smelled of roses. She simmered the freshly washed petals with the sugar syrup. The roses  infused the syrup with their soft scent and tinted the syrup a bright ruby red.

A favorite treat she made in the summer was homemade popsicles. She crushed the ice and molded it into balls on a stick and poured the sticky ruby red liquid all over it. It was such fun, sitting in her garden amongst her flower pots, indulging on what was once growing on the shrub next to us.

Well with summer around the corner, it’s time to bust out the ideal recipe for a cool refreshing drink.  My take on the perfect drink is a homemade rose syrup that’s been infused with cardamom pods, complimented with a hint of licorice flavor, from the fennel seeds and a bit of a zing from the ginger. I seldom use organic red roses to add to the syrup as they cost ‘an arm and a leg’ but if you have access to them, a handful of red petals should do.  In my recipe I’ve used a good quality rose essence to infuse this syrup instead.

Continue reading

For the Love of Ghee!

Ghee is the true essence of the food I grew up eating as a child.


Being of Indian heritage and growing up in Zimbabwe, I am proud to say I have stayed well connected to our indian culture, tradition and most importantly the food.

  • a bowl of fluffy rice dowsed in ghee and a spoonful of sugar.  Pure heaven!
  • a square of perfectly made barfi, an indian sweet confectionary made with milk.
  • a delicate biryani doused in ghee.  Taking days to make with the utmost attention to detail and made with the finest ingredients.
  • hadur waro keer – a warm milky concoction, an antidote to a cold and cough, made with ghee and turmeric, sweetened with jaggery.  Perfect on a cold wintery day before bed time.


However, I’d absolutely devour a good steak and kidney pie in a heart beat.  That’s the great thing about growing up in Zimbabwe, I ate as much homebound indian food, as well as, tonnes of food influenced along the way by british cookery.

  •   Hot, yummy and crispy fish and chips made to perfection.
  •   A moist sausage roll made with the flakiest pastry
  •  and let’s not forget Shepherds pie, just to name a few.


As an Indian who grew up in Africa, I have a unique twist on classic Indian recipes.  As well a bounty of European and now American recipes to share.  Please join me in my epic adventure in jotting down these glorious finds.

Enjoy, comment, and let’s make ghee!!

All recipes and photos on this blog are the copyright of fortheloveofghee.  
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