Introducing Shamim’s Pantry Pasture Grazed Ghee

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Hi my dear friends and fellow bloggers!

Again… it has been a tad bit too long since I wrote to you last.  As I mentioned in my previous post I was working on “Project Ghee”, well I don’t think I called it that exactly … but it sure does sound good right now 🙂

Anyway, let me tell you what I’ve been up too.  I’ve been preoccupied with ‘GHEE’, now I’m sure you shaking your head and thinking, “Really Shamim, like you had to tell us that!” (sarcasm intended)  Well, of course it’s ghee.  Ghee all the way baby!

Since the beginning of this year, Continue reading

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“What Is Ghee?”

 

Ghee in its solid state

Ghee in its solid state

“What is Ghee?” and “Is it bad for you?” Two questions I’m asked, over and over and over again.

I love talking about ghee and it makes me happy.  So…

“FOR THE LOVE OF GHEE!”

I’m finally able to share with you what I know about it.  Without further adieu, I introduce to you, my GHEE FACTS page.

 

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Coriander in My Spice Cupboard

As promised, I am sticking to my plan of introducing one spice at a time to My Spice Cupboard and heres one more – Coriander.

Coriander seeds

Coriander (dhania) Seeds  are the seeds of a mature cilantro plant. The tannish yellow globes are very light in weight and have a subtle citrus flavor. They are grown in Europe and in India too. The coriander seeds grown in India tend to have a more of a citrusy flavor. When selecting them at the store, they Continue reading

Cumin in My Spice Cupboard

Cumin, can be added to many curries as a seed or ground into a powder. In fact, one of the popular spices in most curries IS cumin, believe it or not.

Cumin Seeds

Cumin Seeds

Cumin Seeds

Cumin seeds are slightly crescent shaped with ridges appearing lengthwise around them.  Don’t let the seeds fool you, they may look dry and dusty but the magic is all inside.  In seed form they taste earthy with pungent undertones.

Cumin seeds are used either at the initial stage of cooking a curry or they are popped in hot oil and sprinkled at the end as a garnish.  The hot oil enhances the deep and nutty aroma of the spice. The flavor of the cumin really kicks in when it is cooked.

The most dramatic of techniques, to intensify its flavor, would be to fry it in a little oil or ghee, at a really high temperature until it starts popping. Becareful not to burn them at this stage. If you do, it is best to throw it out and restart with some fresh oil. Continue reading

Turmeric in My Spice Cupboard

Raw Turmeric - member of the Rhizome Family

Raw Turmeric – member of the Rhizome Family

Turmeric, turmeric, turmeric (haldi or hadur)… all the rage now! Everyone wants to talk about turmeric. And why not, there have been loads of evidence-based research that turmeric contains curcumin (not cumin) believed to be a cancer-fighting component.  And it is a powerful anti-inflammatory too, amongst others. Continue reading